Winter Sprinkler Ban Flyer

Download and print this A4 flyer – PDF

Winter Sprinkler Ban jpg


“Since 1970, average rainfall in the south-west of Western Australia has decreased by nearly a fifth“, yet, “demand is expected to increase by about one third by 2030”. See article in The Conversation.

Everyone must do their bit to save water.   Sprinklers are banned from the 1st of June to the 31st of August.

If your neighbours are still watering, drop a flyer in their letter box.

Please share



Posted in Climate Adaptation, Climate Change, Drought, Water, western australia | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Last chance – Comment on draft Perth/Peel Plan

Treeless Today Tonight

The clear felling of trees and vegetation must end, if we are to mitigate dangerous urban heat. Image from Today Tonight segment (click image to view video).

Urgent reminder – Comments on the State Government’s   Perth/Peel Green Growth Plan 5pm on Friday 13 May 2016. See How To Make a Submission
Our biggest concern is the loss of tree canopy cover and vegetation, which increases dangerous urban heat and reduces rainfall.  There are more heat related deaths in WA than there are road fatalities.   Most of Perth’s tree removals are happening on privately owned land.  The State Government has a duty to protect citizens and mitigate urban heat.  It is not enough to focus on bushland areas and street trees, WA urgently needs tree protection laws and Local Governments cannot enforce them without State Government (WAPC) approval.
Also see, WAToday article – WA government ‘asleep at wheel’ on Perth tree protection: Bayswater Councillor, some excellent points by Cr Chris Cornish.
The Urban Bushland Council has done an excellent assessment on how it will affect natural areas.
Following is a submission example by Planning & Environmental Lawyer, Sandra Boulter, who has worked as a Director in Local Government, which she put together very quickly, but it contains some critical points to consider;
To: Draft Perth and Peel Green Growth Plan for 3.5 million Department of the Premier and Cabinet Locked Bag 3001 WEST PERTH WA 6872
Submission on the Draft Perth and Peel Green Growth Plan for 3.5 million December 2015

This is a general submission against using Planning Polices and Action Plans as a mechanism for protection of Perth and Peel Region human, flora and fauna living places, absent any real enforceable legal nexus between planning and development in Western Australia.

Just look at the poor outcomes and loss so far, with this approach.
In no particular order but following the synopsis summary:
1. We need a development assessment approach to development in WA, at present we have a development approval process. This approach has already seen such irretrievable loss.
2. Protecting our natural environment requires identification of connectivity and wildlife corridors between nature reserves, and what each LG needs to do in terms of wildlife corridors through its area

Continue reading

Posted in Bush Forever, Climate Adaptation, Climate Change, Coastal Vegetation, DAPs, Democracy, density, Drought, Environmental Protection, Green space, High-rise, Density & Urban Sprawl, Infill, Nature Preservation, Planning and Public Health, Planning Laws, Public Open Spaces, Remnant Bushland, Urban Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Sea level warnings for canals and coastal properties

SBS sea level rise new website Coastal Risk Australia 15 04 16 CLICK

SBS has reported on a new website called Coastal Risk Australia , designed to help home buyers work out the risks involved with purchasing coastal properties.

Sea level rise is happening faster than expected.  But people are still buying in low lying coastal and river areas and our State and Local Governments are still approving them with gay abandon, despite the warnings?

But who cares what happens in 100 years, right?
Think again, sea level rise is expected to affect some places sooner than that, like in  Mandurah for example.
This is a modelling of the Mandurah/Murray areas expected to be underwater by the year 2100 if the sea level rises by 1.1m as predicted. NOTE: Maps are based on a simple ‘bucket fill’ approach and should be considered as approximate only, source

This is a modelling of the Mandurah/Murray areas expected to be underwater by the year 2100 if the sea level rises by 1.1m as predicted. NOTE: Maps are based on a simple ‘bucket fill’ approach and should be considered as approximate only, source

But isn’t just  sea level rise itself that we have to worry about. Combined with other factors, including warm ocean and surface temperatures, tides, atmospheric pressures, just small differences in sea levels can seriously exasperate the impacts of cyclones and big storms coming in off the ocean.
In Western Australia, like everywhere else, we can expect more extreme weather events going forward.  Cyclones are predicted to come further south, to be more intense and more frequent.  WA has had many cyclones and Perth certainly has been hit by cyclones before;
Cyclones Affecting Perth BOM

Tropical Cyclones Affecting Perth – Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM)

Cyclone Alby in 1978 was a category 5 cyclone and caused the most wide spread storm damage in WA’s history. “Storm surge and large waves caused coastal inundation and erosion from Perth to Busselton”, according to BOM.
Cyclone Alby erosion _floreat

Erosion caused by storm surge and waves by Cyclone Alby at Floreat Beach – BOM

 The image above gives and indication of how high waves/storm surges can reach during cyclones.
It is important to understand the terminology that insurance companies use for the different types of flooding.  In the  major insurance company policies that we checked,  “flooding” refers to flooding caused by rain, but flooding from the ocean is referred to as “inundation from the ocean“, “storm surge“, “tidal surge” or “tsunami“, for example.
All policies happily cover for “tsunami“, because they don’t happen in WA.  The term “tsunami” is  related to earth quake activity and not considered a risk.  Flooding from rain, seems to covered by most, though it is important to check individual policies, because policies are customised to different areas.  An area prone to flash flooding from heavy rain is likely to be more expensive or not cover for flooding at?  Mandurah for example is prone to flash flooding from rain.
It is very hard to find a policy to cover for anything related to flooding from the ocean.  A few still do, we found a couple, but not for anyone, only if you have your home loan with them and only in certain areas. Insurance companies are experts in working out climatic risks. If something is not covered by insurance or if it is extremely expensive to insure, that means they perceive that there is a high likelihood of it happening.
Apart from flash rain flooding in areas with poor drainage (often in built up areas due to poor drainage systems and or a lack of trees and vegetation), major flooding on a large scale from heavy rain events is unlikely in Perth you would think, as our dams are so low now,  it would take rain fall of biblical proportions to fill them to over flowing, as they have in the past?  See this Perth Now article which describes some of the flood events Perth has experienced in the past.
Perth Now (The Sunday Times) tends to trumpet developer propaganda and developers in WA want to build canals and other coastal developments as do their crony politicians.  This could be why this Perth Now article was mainly about less likely rain flooding?  They only mentioned this tiny bit about ocean flooding incidentally,  “sustained strong westerly or northwesterly winds can also cause a build up of water on the coast, flooding parts of the river’s foreshore on high tide with storm surge.   In addition, tropical cyclones are also responsible for flooding.”  Reading this article you wouldn’t get the impression that flooding from storm surge was a significant risk?
The way we see it, the concern is not water rushing down the river from the hills towards Fremantle because of  heavy rain, but rather the other way around, as occurred with Hurricane Sandy in NY, when storm surges pushed in from the ocean up the Hudson River causing devastating inundation.  This is very common with cyclones and hurricanes.  They spin around in one direction, forcing walls of water up onto the  coast.
Storm surge
Storm surge pushing into harbour New York

Storm surge pushing into the harbor New York – Hurricane Sandy

Coastal areas and especially all of the canal developments built in the low lying  estuarine swamp areas between Fremantle and Busselton are especially vulnerable to storm surges and inundation.  Canal houses are built up high off the water, but not as high as decent storm surge.s or high enough to protect surrounding infrastructure and facilities.
Cyclone Alby in 1978 , “Caused the most widespread cyclone damage in Western Australia’s history. Destroyed a large portion of the Busselton Jetty. Affected Perth with the 3rd highest recorded wind gust in the city’s history, 130 km/h (81 mph), and Fremantle with a 143 km/h (89 mph) gust.”
Below is a photo of the Safety Bay Jetty in normal weather, next to two photos take by a resident of Safety Bay during cyclone Bianca, on the 25th of January 2011, with the comment below.
Safety bay jetty - storm surge cyclone Bianca 2011 “Cyclone may have fizzled but we still got a bit of a storm surge, here are two pics of the Jetty at Safety Bay taken about an hour apart, this is the first time I have seen it go under.”
Bianca was  a category 4 cyclone, which fortunately ended up changing direction and caused very little damage to WA’s coast line.  But one can only imagine how high the sea levels would have been if the storm had hit with full force?
Those who do still have insurance in low lying coastal areas for inundation from the ocean, could find that it becomes prohibitively expensive going forward and if they try to sell their properties, the new home buyers may not be able to get it at all?
Floods don’t always happen were they are supposed to happen. As the people of South Carolina have found, you can’t trust Governments to get the risks right . Nearly every major flood or storm that has occurred in Australia or overseas, large numbers are caught out, thinking they were insured, when they weren’t.
Perhaps in other parts of the world, as is apparent in WA, politicians are more interested in the short term profits of their developer mates and/or the short term profits to be made in selling public coastal land to developers for coastal developments and  canal estates (i.e. Point Peron in Rockingham)?  The well being of ordinary citizens seems to be the last thing on their minds a lot of the time?
Approving new high risk developments could bankrupt Local Governments going forward, if their Local Government indemnity insurers refuse to cover claims made by members of the public made against them, should a big cyclone cause a lot of damage?  Government planning authorities have a duty of care to protect citizens, this is the main purpose of Town Planning, to ensure safe orderly development.  The public have right to assume that if planning authorities approves a development, then it must be considered to be safe, based on the best science available to them at the time?
Erosion at Seabird is a continuing nightmare for the Shire of Gingin and ratepayers.  The State Government can’t be counted on to pick up the pieces?
Property boundaries are crumbling in Seabird. Photo: ABC News, Bonnie Christian

Property boundaries are crumbling in Seabird. Photo: ABC News, Bonnie Christian

Just encase you would like to visit the new Coastal Risk Australia website , you may have to wait a few days?  We have been trying for the last couple of days and it is still busy.  Hardly surprising.
Coast Risks Australia website 16 04 16
Posted in Canal Developments, Climate Adaptation, Climate Change, Extreme Weather, Planning and Public Health, Point Peron, Storm Surge, West Australian Government | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Barnett’s War on Trees

Now it is the Shenton Park Rehabilitation Hospital bushland and its magnificent mature shade trees under threat!

Shenton Rehab bush under threat

Have your say

Civilized cities in developed countries (and even many developing counties) are working on strategies to increase their urban tree canopies to protect their citizens from increasing urban temperatures.  But our draconian, stuck in the 70’s, Barnett State Government is allowing developers to bulldoze as many trees as they like at will.

The even scarier thing is that one of the worst offending developer in WA is the State Government themselves – Landcorp.

Shenton Rehab bush in firing line

The Post, 16 January 2016, pages 24-25

Shenton Rehab bush in firing line p45

Continue reading

Posted in Climate Adaptation, Climate Change, Extreme Weather, heat illness, heat stress, heat waves, High-rise, Density & Urban Sprawl, Infill, LandCorp, Uncategorized, Urban Forest, Urban Heat Island Effect, West Australian Government | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Planning rhetoric versus reality – Urban infill in Perth’s inner suburbs

A public lecture by prominent urbanist Dr Linley Lutton

Thursday 26 November, 2015

7PM (doors open 6.30PM)

The Palms (map),  Crn Nicholson & Rokeby Rds, Subiaco

Please RSVP by email  to

Density lecture Linley Lutton

Download flyer PDF or JPEG

See Facebook event page

Posted in density, High-rise, Density & Urban Sprawl, Planning and Public Health, Planning Laws, Public Open Spaces, West Australian Government | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Public comment on application DAO370/15 and DAO373/15 Arthur Head

John Dowson - Image from the Fremantle Herald (Click to read article)

John Dowson – Image from the Fremantle Herald (Click image  to read article)

I am aghast at the damage Fremantle Council seeks to wreak on the hugely significant but fragile historic Arthur Head area, a place where the whole of Western Australia was claimed for the British Empire in 1829, where the state’s oldest public building the Round House sits, and where much of the state’s early history had a beginning.

This severe damage is part of a pattern where council seeks to ‘revitalise’ an area they think is underutilised, and then goes so far overboard, they end up doing irreparable damage to it.

The reasonings and arguments put forward are laughable. The impact of the proposals is significant and negative and does not ‘highlight the cultural and historical values of the historic West End’. Continue reading

Posted in heritage, Local Government Amalgamations, Public Open Spaces | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Why Mayors Should Rule the World

Benjamin Barber Why Mayors Should Rule the World

With Local Government Elections coming up on the 17th of October, it is a good time to reflect on the role and importance of Local Governments and the Barnett Government’s ‘War on Local Government’?


See this excellent Ted Talk by Benjamin Barber –  Why Mayors Should Rule the World

“It often seems like federal-level politicians care more about creating gridlock than solving the world’s problems. So who’s actually getting bold things done? City mayors. So, political theorist Benjamin Barber suggests: Let’s give them more control over global policy. Barber shows how these “urban homeboys” are solving pressing problems on their own turf — and maybe in the world.”

Posted in Climate Change, DAPs, Democracy, High-rise, Density & Urban Sprawl, Local Government, Planning and Public Health, Sustainability | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment